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Consumer Lifestyles: Food Scares Research

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About the Food Scares in China Research Report

The combined effect of greater media freedom and the rising scope and range of exported foods has intensified the spotlight on China’s food industry. Problems that were historically ‘covered up’ or never made ‘public’ are now reaching news and information (blogs/internet) channels. As a result, it appears that the number of food scares or instances of dangerous foods getting into the marketplace has risen. http://www.bharatbook.com/market-research-reports/consumer-goods-market-research-report/consumer-lifestyles-food-scares-research-china-september-2012.html

For the purposes of this report, Mintel commissioned a quantitative research survey carried out online to explore consumer attitudes towards food scares.

Fieldwork was conducted in April 2012, in five Tier 1 cities and five Tier 2 cities of 3,000 adults aged 20+. Tier 1 cities include Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen.

Introduction
Research methodology Abbreviations Cleaning up China’s national food supply chain from farm to fork Market background – the root of the problem Exports still on the rise

Executive Summary
A brief history of food poisoning
Figure 1: China’s Food Expenditure, 2005-10
Plotting China’s broken food chain – from farm to fork
Figure 2: China’s Shrinking Farm Land – arable land capita, 1960-2030
Figure 3: The rising power of the supermarket in China, 2007-11
Major recent food scare issues Government focusing on regulatory improvement
Figure 4: How likely are you to pay a premium price for fair trade, March 2012
Consumers look to protect themselves
Figure 5: Top 5 top-up shopping destinations, March 2012
Figure 6: Categories of “organic” food ever bought in the last 12 months, March 2012
Figure 7: Preference for local or international brands, March 2012
The future

A Brief History of Food Poisoning in China
Key points China’s consumers wake up to the danger on their plates
Figure 8: China’s Food Expenditure, 2005-10
SFDA set up to supervise the food industry Food scares go global – US pet food contamination Sanlu milk scandal Other scandals What it means
Plotting China’s Broken Food Chain – From Farm to Fork

Major Recent Food Scares
Key points Toxic Plasticiser
Figure 18: China’s total carbonated soft drinks sales (on-trade and off-trade), by volume, 2006-10
Steroids
Figure 19: Meat Output in China, 2005-10
“Gutter Oil”
Figure 20: A most essential ingredient: China’s cooking oil market, 2005-15
Figure 21: China: Volume year-on-year growth, 2005-15
Dyed Steamed Buns China’s exploding watermelons Bottled foreign nitrate
Figure 22: China’s growing taste for bottled water, 2004-15
Figure 23: China bottled water market share, 2009-11
Frozen dirty dumplings What it means

Government Focusing on Regulatory Improvement
Key points Muddled regulatory enforcement slows development The big nine authorities (at ministry level) Selected lesser agencies (below ministry level) Regulatory system remains inefficient and lacks effectiveness ‘Strike Back’ Legal system responses – the old problem: enforcement Food scares damage brands Certification lacks consistency Fair Trade
Figure 24: How likely are you to pay a premium price for fair trade, March 2012
What it means

Consumers Look to Protect Themselves
Key points Self-protection strategy 1 – opt for the supermarket: adopting chain retailing
Figure 25: Where to buy? Main weekly shopping and top-up shopping destination, March 2012
Figure 26: Main weekly grocery shop by age and gender, March 2012
Self protection strategy 2 – study the label: consumer use of packaging information
Figure 27: Consumer likelihood of checking packaging information and labelling, March 2012
Figure 28: Label checking: the case of infant formula, March 2012
Self protection strategy 3 – living the green life: go organic
Figure 29: Categories of “organic” food ever bought in the last 12 months, March 2012
Figure 30: Where to buy “organic”?, March 2012
Figure 31: Is “organic” and “green” worth paying more for?, March 2012
Figure 32: The non-specific vs. the scientific - claims worth paying more for, March 2012
Figure 33: The non-specific vs. the scientific - claims worth paying more for, March 2012
Self protection strategy 4 – buying international: rejecting domestic brands for foreign ones
Figure 34: Preference for local or international brands, March 2012
Self protection strategy 5 – cutting out the bad stuff: opting out of food and beverage categories
Figure 35: Reasons for buying less than last year, March 2012
What it means

The Future
Key points Problems remaining local but Chinese food is going global Changing the way China farms Signs of progress? China is now a low trust society, not a no trust society

Places to Buy
Figure 36: Shopping destination, March 2012
Figure 37: Most popular main weekly grocery shopping destination, by demographics, March 2012
Figure 38: Most popular top-up shopping destination, by demographics, March 2012
Figure 39: Next most popular top-up shopping destination, by demographics, March 2012
Figure 40: Other top-up shopping destination, by demographics, March 2012

For more information kindly visit :
Consumer Lifestyles: Food Scares Research - China - September 2012

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