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Lifestyle Changes for Bladder Health

by abstress1

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One of the most frustrating things for men and women is the constant need or urge to go to the bathroom regardless of whether or not you just went to the bathroom. This sudden, intense desire to go to the bathroom to avoid is a core symptom of an overactive bladder.

For those people who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer and are undergoing treatment, this problem can be time-consuming and emotionally draining. The positive side, however, can be that it allows you to look at your life in new ways and evaluate and reflect on the life you had before you learned you had cancer. Did you engage in activities that might have made you less healthy? Perhaps you indulged in too alcohol, ate more than you needed, smoked, or didn't exercise as frequently as you knew you should. Feeling guilty or blaming yourself is counterproductive. The better thing to do is to start making changes that can have positive effects for the rest of your life. The benefits, although not necessarily immediately, will in time help you feel better and most assuredly, be healthier.

Studies have shown that the adoption of behavioral modification plus drug therapy actually gives you your best treatment outcome for people with the overactive bladder condition. To begin the process, physicians will start by asking patients about fluid intake, what those fluids are, the frequency of intake and whether or not there are high amounts of caffeine. The biggest area of improvement with behavioral modification is awareness of how much fluid we drink per day and really how much caffeine slips into our diet. It may seem obvious that drinking too much fluid may aggravate bladder problems, but so too can drinking too little. If you don't drink enough water or another type of fluid, your urine becomes very concentrated. This will lead to overactive bladder symptoms of urgency and frequency.

Diuretics used to treat heart conditions can also aggravate bladder problems, as can heart medications, such as calcium channel blockers. The nicotine in cigarettes is a bladder stimulant. In addition, smoking causes poor circulation, which is bad for the bladder. Coughing seems to go hand in hand with smoking and a person who smokes for a long period of time may develop a chronic cough. This constant coughing puts pressure on the ligaments in the pelvis and can actually lead to some nerve damage in the pelvis, leading to urgency, frequency and incontinence.

As with any condition that affects us physically, losing weight can help with bladder problems as well, because excess weight can put pressure on the bladder. Constipation can also lead to extra pressure.

All in all, simple lifestyle changes can help a person who suffers from overactive bladder health issues, but these changes may not seem simple at first. For someone who has smoked all their life, stopping is not as simple as throwing away cigarettes. For someone who has had a cup of coffee (at least) every morning for three decades, he is not going to be able to one day just not have coffee. Lifestyle changes take time and diligence but the end result is a healthier bladder and the resumption of a lifestyle where you have control instead of being controlled by it.

Although the lifestyle changes may seem drastic and it may feel that you are on a solitary journey with very few visible signs to show for the effort, Health Reviser can offer you a daily snapshot of your health system to show that indeed these changes are having a positive influence on you. By being able to health monitor your system, you can tweak your diet or your exercise to continue to become the best and healthiest you possible. For more visit

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